The Life of a Widow is Hard!

     The Widow's Might Program seeks to instruct, encourage, and empower these women shown below by providing food assistance each month, five goats in the first year (to help them start their own self sustaining herd), skills training, and Bible instruction. The cost of this program is $65 per month, and the length of the program for each sponsored widow is 24 months.

     We are thrilled that more 60 widows have already completed this 24 month program, and another 85 widows are currently in the program. Others have been interviewed and qualified for this program, but still wait for sponsors.

     Click on the video below to hear Pastor Jeff's testimony of how sponsoring a widow has blessed him and his family. Then scroll down to learn about widows currently waiting be part of this life-changing opportunity. You may sign up on this page to sponsor any one of them.

Sponsor a Widow

$65/month for 24 months

 

We have just interviewed and approved a whole new batch of widows. They are prayerfully asking for your consideration in giving them a new life filled with hope. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to email or to call us. Your sponsorship is life-changing! More than 80 widows are currently being helped, but the need is endless!

 

Peninnah Nduku

KIB-WM23

 

Peninnah was born in 1975 in Machakos, and she attended school up to the 8th grade. She married James Nzioka when she was 19 years old, and they had five children before he passed away in 2004 from malaria and liver disease.  His family allowed her to stay for another five years, but then they chased Peninnah away, taking everything from her and leaving her to support her family by herself with no support.  She was diagnosed with HIV in 2010.  Her 15 year old daughter died in 2020 when she touched a live electrical wire while cooking.  Peninnah does casual work such as laundry and housecleaning to support her family. 

 

Kibera is the name of an area located within the heart of the capital of Nairobi. It is the third largest slum in the world with over a million people living in a very small area. Life in Kibera is difficult with most of its residents living in extreme poverty, earning less than a dollar a day.  Kibera is a maze of narrow, deeply rutted alleys lined with mud and corrugated metal houses.  The majority living there lack the most basic services such as electricity, clean water, and medical care.

Kimanyisho Koisukir

ORK-WM57

 

Kimanyisho's husband died in 1996 from old age.  She was his only wife, and she was pregnant with her fifth child at the time of his passing. When we asked her how old she was when she married, she responded that she was very young and still had "milk teeth." She did have the opportunity to attend school up until second grade. At that time her step- mother passed away, and she need to drop out of school to care for the baby who was only 8 months old at the time. Several years later she herself was married. Kimanyisho has supported her family all of these years by taking care of cows. She has one child still at home, and cares for five grandchildren as well.   

 

Kimanyisho comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar.  There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs. After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Kaaka Yiaile

ORK-WM36

 

Kaaka is the second of two wives. Her husband passed away ten years ago. The has eight boys, Two of them are married, and she has three grandchildren. Kaaka never have the opportunity to attend school. Her biggest challenges are school fees and food to feed her family. Kaaka said, "I have heard good things about this program, how widows are receiving assistance and learning how to make bread that helps them earn money."  

 

Kaaka comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar.  There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs. After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Nabiki Kipeno NKU-WM45

 

Nabiki was married when she was ten years old, and never had the opportunity to attend school. Her husband died of old age, leaving her with a total of eleven children (five boys and six girls). She usually supports her family by working in other people's gardens. Nabiki has three cows, ten sheep and five goats, but these are barely enough to support her very large family. She still has three children in school, two in primary and one boy in high school. The challenges for Nabiki are immense. Providing food, clothing, and school fees for her children are extremely difficult.

 

Nabiki comes from the Maasai community of Nkoisusu. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Melwa Paan NKU-WM48

 

Melwa was married between 10-12 years of age and never had the opportunity to attend school. Her husband died of old age. She has five children (three boys and two girls).The two girls are in primary school and the boys are all in high school. Melwa faces a lot of challenges trying to provide for her family.. She normally supports her home by purchasing corn wholesale and then reselling on market days.

 

Melwa comes from the Maasai community of Nkoisusu. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

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