The Life of a Widow is Hard!

     The Widow's Might Program seeks to instruct, encourage, and empower these women shown below by providing food assistance each month, five goats in the first year (to help them start their own self sustaining herd), skills training, and Bible instruction. The cost of this program is $65 per month, and the length of the program for each sponsored widow is 24 months.

     We are thrilled that several dozen widows have already completed this 24 month program and another many are currently in the program. Others have been interviewed and qualified for this program, but still wait for sponsors.

     Click on the video below to hear Pastor Jeff's testimony of how sponsoring a widow has blessed him and his family. Then scroll down to learn about widows currently waiting be part of this life-changing opportunity. You may sign up on this page to sponsor any one of them.

Sponsor a Widow

$65/month for 24 months

 

We have just interviewed and approved a whole new batch of widows. They are prayerfully asking for your consideration in giving them a new life filled with hope. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to email or to call us. Your sponsorship is life-changing! More than 80 widows are currently being helped, but the need is endless!

 

Jane Geseko

KIB-WM18

 

Jane is the last of six children.  She attended school up to the 7th grade but had to drop out because her father passed away, and her mom could not afford the school fees. Jane married Patrick Khafumi, and they raised a family of three girls.  Patrick was killed by the police after fleeing the scene of an accident when their children were very young. Jane's husband’s family took everything from her since the community does not value girls, and she was left with nothing.  She now has eight grandchildren, three of whom live with her, and she does laundry and house cleaning to support her family. 

 

Kibera is the name of an area located within the heart of the capital of Nairobi. It is the third largest slum in the world with over a million people living in a very small area. Life in Kibera is difficult with most of its residents living in extreme poverty, earning less than a dollar a day.  Kibera is a maze of narrow, deeply rutted alleys lined with mud and corrugated metal houses.  The majority living there lack the most basic services such as electricity, clean water, and medical care.

Linet Multavi

KIB-WM19

 

Linet married Joel Multavi when she was 20 years old.  She was able to attend school up to the 7th grade but had to drop out because her family could not afford the school fees.  They had four children before he passed away in January of 2020 due to kidney problems caused by his alcoholism. Joel often beat her and the children while he was drunk.  Many times they were without food because he spent their money on alcohol.  Thankfully Linet's husband’s family did not take anything from her, but they have not assisted her at all.  She does small jobs like doing laundry or cleaning houses to sustain herself and her children, typically working around three days a week and earning between $3-$5 a day.  It is very hard for her to pay school fees, rent, and to be able to put food on the table.  

 

Kibera is the name of an area located within the heart of the capital of Nairobi. It is the third largest slum in the world with over a million people living in a very small area. Life in Kibera is difficult with most of its residents living in extreme poverty, earning less than a dollar a day.  Kibera is a maze of narrow, deeply rutted alleys lined with mud and corrugated metal houses.  The majority living there lack the most basic services such as electricity, clean water, and medical care.

Immaculate Munyipha

KIB-WM21

 

Immaculate attended school up to the 7th grade, but her parents could not afford the school fees for herself and her three younger siblings. Her husband, who was from the Maasai tribe, took her to live with his family, and the couple had three children. Immaculate found it very difficult to live within the Maasai community because she is from the Kikamba tribe, and the family was not very kind to her. Her husband passed away in 2011 from tuberculosis while in Nairobi, and his famlly took everything away from her and sent her away. She supports her family by taking in laundry. However, this work is becoming harder and harder to find 

 

Kibera is the name of an area located within the heart of the capital of Nairobi. It is the third largest slum in the world with over a million people living in a very small area. Life in Kibera is difficult with most of its residents living in extreme poverty, earning less than a dollar a day.  Kibera is a maze of narrow, deeply rutted alleys lined with mud and corrugated metal houses.  The majority living there lack the most basic services such as electricity, clean water, and medical care.

Kimanyisho Koisukir

ORK-WM57

 

Kimanyisho's husband died in 1996 from old age.  She was his only wife, and she was pregnant with her fifth child at the time of his passing. When we asked her how old she was when she married, she responded that she was very young and still had "milk teeth." She did have the opportunity to attend school up until second grade. At that time her step- mother passed away, and she need to drop out of school to care for the baby who was only 8 months old at the time. Several years later she herself was married. Kimanyisho has supported her family all of these years by taking care of cows. She has one child still at home, and cares for five grandchildren as well.   

 

Kimanyisho comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar.  There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs. After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Kaaka Yiaile

ORK-WM36

 

Kaaka is the second of two wives. Her husband passed away ten years ago. The has eight boys, Two of them are married, and she has three grandchildren. Kaaka never have the opportunity to attend school. Her biggest challenges are school fees and food to feed her family. Kaaka said, "I have heard good things about this program, how widows are receiving assistance and learning how to make bread that helps them earn money."  

 

Kaaka comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar.  There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs. After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Nabaru Otuni NKU-WM44

 

Nabaru was married at a very early age, between 10-12 years old, and did not have the chance to attend school at all. Her husband was killed by an elephant in the bush while he was herding cows.  At the time of his death, she had six children (four boys and two girls). Three of the children are still in school. One of her daughters is married.  Nabaru has 5 cows, 8 goats and 2 sheep. She sells sugar, flour and tea leaves on market days to support her family. She is unable to do hard work such as working in gardens, making charcoal, etc. because her right hand was severely burned and is not straight.  Due to this injury she finds work a real challenge.

 

Nabaru comes from the Maasai community of Nkoisusu. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Nabiki Kipeno NKU-WM45

 

Nabiki was married when she was ten years old, and never had the opportunity to attend school. Her husband died of old age, leaving her with a total of eleven children (five boys and six girls). She usually supports her family by working in other people's gardens. Nabiki has three cows, ten sheep and five goats, but these are barely enough to support her very large family. She still has three children in school, two in primary and one boy in high school. The challenges for Nabiki are immense. Providing food, clothing, and school fees for her children are extremely difficult.

 

Nabiki comes from the Maasai community of Nkoisusu. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

Melwa Paan NKU-WM48

 

Melwa was married between 10-12 years of age and never had the opportunity to attend school. Her husband died of old age. She has five children (three boys and two girls).The two girls are in primary school and the boys are all in high school. Melwa faces a lot of challenges trying to provide for her family.. She normally supports her home by purchasing corn wholesale and then reselling on market days.

 

Melwa comes from the Maasai community of Nkoisusu. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community.  Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have and walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water, they then have to look for firewood for cooking and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5-mile walk if not longer.

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