The Life of a Widow is Hard!

     The Widow's Might Program seeks to instruct, encourage, and empower these women shown below by providing food assistance each month, five goats in the first year (to help them start their own self sustaining herd), skills training, and Bible instruction. The cost of this program is $65 per month, and the length of the program for each sponsored widow is 24 months.

     We are thrilled that 36 widows have already completed this 24 month program and another 59 are currently in the program. Another 29 have been interviewed and qualified for this program, but still wait for sponsors.

     Click on the video below to hear Pastor Jeff's testimony of how sponsoring a widow has blessed him and his family. Then scroll down to learn about widows currently waiting be part of this life-changing opportunity. You may sign up on this page to sponsor any one of them.

Nairurari Mwanik

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Nairurari was a mere 14 years old when she was married before she had the opportunity to attend school.  She was the second wife of her husband.  The first wife was extremely jealous and treated her poorly.  When the abuse did not work, the first wife returned to her family and would not return, even after the husband tried to bring her back. 

 

Her husband died in 1974 when a tractor he was driving rolled and killed him.  They had three children, and she lives with one of her sons and his family.  All her land, animals and possessions were taken from her at the time of her husband's death.  The family even took her  daughter to marry her, so that they could keep the bride price.  Nairurari went to the area chief and successfully rescued her 9 year old daughter.  As payback for their failed attempt, the family severely beat Nairurari. 

 

Nashuru Ngojine

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Nashuru's family married her at a very young and tender age of 11.  She remembers being very scared.  She was the second of three wives.  The first wife was very kind to her and took good care of her.  The third wife that came after her was also very young.  Her husband died in January of 2021 due to kidney failure.  She is the mother of three boys and two girls. Her girls are married and she lives with her sons.  She helps supports the family by working in the corn and bean fields when work is available. 

 

Mulejo Otuni

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Mluejo had the opportunity to attend school up to the sixth grade.  She was married by the time she was 17 years old.  She is the first of three wives.  Her husband died in 2015 from illness, leaving her with four children. One of her daughters still lives with her.  She supports her family by doing garden work, despite struggling with problems with her eyes.  Her biggest challenge is supporting her family.​   

 

Siota Letoluo

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Siota’s husband passed away this year in February from high blood pressure.  She was the first of five wives.  Siota never had the opportunity to attend school.  She is the mother of six children, four who are still at home with her.  Most of their livestock was sold to pay for hospital bills. She tries to support her family by selling tea wholesale and then reselling at the small village markets.  Her biggest challenges are paying school fees and feeding her family.

 

Siota comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community. Their daily work consists: of milking any animals they have, walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water they then have to look for firewood for cooking, and washing clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5 mile walk if not longer.  

 

Agnes Parmu

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Agnes had the unusual privilege of being able to attend school up to first grade. Unfortunately it was not long enough for her to learn how to read and write. Her husband passed away in 2018 from kidney problems.  She has four children, two of whom are in school.  To support her family she sells soap, tea and sugar at the local market.  Her biggest challenges are paying school fees and affording food to feed her family.

Agnes comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community. Their daily work consists of milking any animals they have, walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water they then have to look for firewood for cooking, and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5 mile walk, if not longer.  

Nooseuri Kipetu

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Nooseuri was married when she was just 15 years old.  She is the second of three wives.  Her husband passed away 25 years ago from malaria.  She had three children, all of whom are grown. One of her married sons live with her.  He drives a motorbike taxi to earn money but it is not enough for the needs of the family and they often have to beg from neighbors and family members.  Her biggest challenges are food, clothing and money for medicine when they are sick.

Nooseuri comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community. Their daily work consists: of milking any animals they have, walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water they then have to look for firewood for cooking, and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5 mile walk if not longer.  

Noonkipa Moouka

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Noonkipa was married between the ages of 15-20 years old.  She did not have the chance to attend school. When she was married, her father said, “go home with this man, he is now your husband.” She did not know him until that day. She was his second wife.  Her husband died at home 20 years ago from malaria.  She was pregnant with her fourth child at the time of his death. She has three boys still in school.  She has a few sheep and cows that she sells to help pay for school fees, food and clothes. She often has to beg from other family members to assist her, but they do not.  She is very grateful for the food assistance she received during the pandemic.

     Noonkipa comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community. Their daily work consists: of milking any animals they have, walking long distances to fetch water that they carry home on their backs.  After fetching water they then have to look for firewood for cooking, and wash clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5 mile walk if not longer.

Nayewuo Saago

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Nayewuo was only 15 years old when her father sent her off to be the second wife of  the man who was to become her husband.  She never had the opportunity to attend school.  Her husband died of pneumonia in 2020, leaving her to care and provide for seven children.  Six of those children are in school, and she finds it extremely difficult to supply school fees for so many students.  Two of her boys would like to proceed to high school, but she does not have the funds to make this possible. 

Nayewuo comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community. Her daily work consists: of milking any animals she has, walking long distances to fetch water that she carries home on her back.  After fetching water she then has to look for firewood, and washes clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5 mile walk, if not further. 

Noorparakuo Sairowua

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Noorparakuo was only 14 years old when she was married, without ever having attended school.  She said that she was very scared, but her father told her to go home with the man he had chosen for her to marry. She was the first wife but he would later marry another wife.  He passed away 20 years ago from malaria, leaving her with five children to support on her own.  A grandchild from one son also lives with her because his family is even more needy than hers. The grandchild is eight years old, and would like to attend school but there is no money for the required fees and uniform. She does not have any livestock to support her family, so she often is forced to beg from neighbors and family just to survive.    

Noorparakuo comes from the Maasai community of Orkarkar. There is nothing easy about life in this rural, remote community. Her daily work consists: of milking any animals she has, walking long distances to fetch water that she carries home on her back.  After fetching water she then has to look for firewood, and washes clothes by hand. The closest market to purchase essentials is at least a 5 mile walk, if not further. 

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